::Make A Difference::

For the past couple of years I have been absolutely obsessed with watching Whale Wars. I was first attracted to the series because I love animals and was in aw of the extent the volunteers are willing to go. I remained glued to my television every Friday evening because the show was about more than seventy volunteers living on ships in the Arctic ocean. It became about knowledge. Knowledge about the amount of profit the Japanese make off of the whales, knowledge about the Japanese whaler’s inability to take responsibility for their actions. Most importantly, knowledge about an issue that I had never thought or heard about, whales dying for profit. This series sparked my interest to learn more about the world I live in.

The success of Whale Wars brought to light another horrible tradition in parts of Japan, the annual killing of dolphins. Sunday August 29th Animal Planet aired the 2009 documentary entitled, The Cove. The Cove, is an amazing documentary that captures the horrible deaths of thousands of dolphins every year off the coast of Taji Japan. It also shows one man’s incredible dedication to right a wrong he feels responsible for. Ric O’Barry was the primary trainer and actor in the 1960’s telivision series Flipper. If you have not heard of or watched this documentary, it will change your life.

Starting Friday September 3rd, Animal Planet will air the series premiere of Blood Dolphins. The series films Ric O’Barry and his quest to stop dolphin slaughter around the world.

I am writing this post to share a little of what I have learned; ignorance is not bliss. Just as a majority of Japan is unaware of the dolphin slaughter taking place I believe most of America is unaware of what happens in our country as well. I do not believe all Japanese people are evil, I believe a select few have been allowed to make awful choices.

Educate yourself about where your food comes from. An amazingly education source is Food Inc. However, there are issues even Food Inc does not address. For example, longline fishing in America.

Our need for excess and demand for immediate results is killing our country and our world. This is bigger than global warming and driving a hybrid. These issues deserve every individual’s attention if there is any hope for our generations grandchildren to survive. I know I do not have the answer, I am not even certain there are an answers to the problems that plague our world. What I do know is that change cannot happen without education.